once I was half flower, half self,
that invisible self whose absence inhabits mirrors,
that invisible flower that is always inwardly
groping up through us, a kind of outswelling weakness,
yes once I was half frail, half glittering,
continually emerging from the store of the self itself,
always staring at rivers, always
nodding and leaning to one side, I came gloating up,
and for a while I was half skin half breath,
for a while I was neither one thing nor another,
a waterflame, a variable man-woman of the verges,
wearing the last self-image I was left with
before my strength went down down into the darkness
for the best of the year and lies here crumpled
in a clot of sleep at the root of all nothings
— ‘Narcissus’, Alice Oswald (from Weeds and Wild Flowers, published 2011)

Dame of Thrones
W, September 2012
ph. Tim Walker
model: Kristen McMenamy

post-impressionisms:

A Way of Flying, Francisco Goya. 1816-1823.

Whilst everyday clothes for men were increasingly made of wool from the 1770s, for formal occasions such as court events or official receptions and assemblies in regional towns, menswear remained much more sumptuous, decorated and colourful. Suits were made of rich silk satins and velvets, which were exquisitely and ornately embroidered with coloured silks in floral designs. Such suits were often professionally sewn by the piece in French workshops, then imported to England where they could be made-up and fitted to the wearer by an English tailor. 

This court suit was probably worn by Sir John Stanley of Alderley, who was a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to George lll. The museum also has five other suits from the same source, several of them equally highly embroidered. Such suits would have been worn with a fine ruffled linen shirt and cravat, white silk stockings and a black wool-felt bicorne hat as carried by the man in the fashion plate. They represent the height of eighteenth century elegance and opulence, when men were as elaborately dressed as women.

jaded-mandarin:

Portrait of a Lady, Called Elizabeth, Lady Tanfield, 1615. Detail.

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Merton College, Oxford. 

huwp0ts:

Kate Bush, 1978

huwp0ts:

Kate Bush, 1978

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Les liaisons dangereuses/ Dangerous Liaisons' by Choderlos de Laclos, illustrated by George Barbier. Published 1934 by Le Vasseur et Cie, Paris.

Description:  A French epistolary novel about the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two rivals (and ex-lovers) who use seduction as a weapon to humiliate and degrade others, while enjoying their cruel games and boasting about their manipulative talents.

Source

labellefilleart:

Nouvart Dzeron, a Daughter of Armenia, Ralph Elmer Clarkson

"I cast Rosamund because I knew she wasn’t going to play Jane as a nice, simple person. Jane has a real interior world, she has her heart broken.”

(Joe Wright, Director)

beggars-opera:

A delightful game for Victorian children - can you figure out what this is? Is it a moldy potato? Swamp fungus? The Elephant Man? No! It’s a puppy! Puppies are now horrifying. That’s your entertainment for the day, now back down to the mines with you. x

ardatli:

sciencefictionbaby:

this next trick is a little something i like to call “bulking out my bibliography with articles I barely looked at”

“Works Sighted”

oorequiemoo:

Ruth St Denis in “Egypta”, 1910
——
Ruth St. Denis (January 20, 1879 – July 21, 1968) was a modern dance pioneer, introducing eastern ideas into the art. She was co-founder of the American Denishawn School of Dance and the teacher of several notable performers.

oorequiemoo:

Ruth St Denis in “Egypta”, 1910

——

Ruth St. Denis (January 20, 1879 – July 21, 1968) was a modern dance pioneer, introducing eastern ideas into the art. She was co-founder of the American Denishawn School of Dance and the teacher of several notable performers.

artschoolglasses:

Stairwell in the Musee Jacquemart-Andre

artschoolglasses:

Stairwell in the Musee Jacquemart-Andre